Research

The Tissue Biomechanics Lab is focused on a variety of projects ranging from basic science questions to applied research projects with clinical and industry-based collaborators.  Current projects are listed below.  Recently completed projects are here.

 

SHOULDER
A rotator cuff tear is when one of the main tendons in the shoulder is injured and account for over 4.5 million physician visits per year.  We investigate the mechanical changes of the torn tendon and the secondary mechanical changes on the remaining tissues.

Publications from this work:
Sensitivity of Cartilage Pressure to Ligament Stiffness During Shoulder Abduction
Effect of ligament stiffness on shoulder cartilage pressure and kinematics

 

BONE
We study the mechanics of bone during growth and aging, and how disease affects structure-mechanical function relationships in bone.

Videos:
MicroCT fly through video
Publications from this work:
Movement as Life’s Force: Mechanobiology-Based Physiotherapy Protocols to Potentiate Cellular Healing and Tissue Regeneration.
The radial distribution of intracortical porosity within the fibula diaphysis
Reconstructing knee posture in humans, chimpanzees and gorillas: subchondral and trabecular signals
Which bone properties provide the best indicators of habitual posture?

Previous contributors:
Eric Currier, MS

LIGAMENT
Ligaments connect bones and are primary stabilizers during joint movement.  We are interested in the role of microstructure (collagen fibers) and the mechanical properties of ligament.

 

Microstructural measurements of collagen and strain in ligaments Researcher: Hafizur Rahman, PhD Candidate Collaborators: WooWon Lee (PhD Candidate), Prof. Kimani Toussaint
Publications from this work:

Application of quantitative second-harmonic generation microscopy to posterior cruciate ligament for crimp analysis studies
The Effect of Structural Variation on Ligament Apparent Properties
Crimp characterization of porcine posterior cruciate ligament by second-harmonic generation imaging

 

 Recently completed studies